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Artists at Noguchi: Sounds of Akari by Anne Lanzilotti

Friday, April 6, 2018, 6:30pm at The Noguchi Museum

In celebration of the exhibition Akari: Sculpture by Other Means, The Noguchi Museum presents Sounds of Akari, a musical performance featuring violist Anne Leilehua Lanzilotti, harpist Ashley Jackson, and flutist Alice Teyssier in a program featuring an original composition by Lanziotti and works by Claude Debussy, Andrew Norman, and Toru Takemitsu.

Inspired by the poetic, ephemeral nature of Isamu Noguchi’s Akari, Lanzilotti incorporates sounds of Akari themselves into her work for flute, viola, and harp. Recordings of tapping, opening and closing, and rubbing the washi paper, bamboo, and wire of the lanterns evoke the feeling of being inside the light sculptures. Additionally, the three instrumental parts of the composition draw subtly from the other pieces on the program, incorporating works of the past as Noguchi was inspired by the transformation of traditional paper lanterns into modern lights.

Following the premiere of Lanzilotti’s work, the program will continue with three other works that evoke the fragility and lightness of Akari. Itinerant was written by Takematsu in memory of Noguchi shortly after his death. The work changes moods frequently to reflect the transient nature of Noguchi’s life. Norman’s Sabina recalls sunrise in the Church of Santa Sabina, in Rome, Italy, drawing a comparison to the way that Akari makes light soft and beautiful by filtering it through washi paper. Finally, Debussy’s Sonata for Flute, Viola, and Harp moves through moments of lightness and joy and fragile sound as timbres of these three instruments combine.

This program is free and coincides with Free First Friday, with free admission offered throughout the day. RSVP recommended: publicprograms@noguchi.org

The concert will coincide with the release of my new album The Akari Sessions (featuring Romina Monsanto). While the album stands alone, it is meant to be listened to in the exhibit, Akari: Sculpture by Other Means.

Obsidian Sound Sculptures at The Noguchi Museum by Anne Lanzilotti

I got another chance to play with these incredible obsidian sounding stones by Isamu Noguchi! Although they are normally not displayed publicly, The Noguchi Museum staff has been very generously allowing me to improvise on them and record the sounds to workshop a new piece I'm writing for the stones, strings and voice. The premiere of my piece will be part of a concert at The Noguchi Museum on Sunday, February 5, 2017 at 3pm. The concert is free with museum admission. Here are a couple videos from last month when I was experimenting with different ways of playing the stones:

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UPDATE: Here is the archival footage of the premiere of birth, death filmed on location at The Noguchi Museum.

This work was written in honor of the exhibition of Isamu Noguchi’s two sculptures Birth (1934) and Death (1934) being displayed together in the same gallery for the first time. The two obsidian sound sculptures used in birth, deathUntitled (1978) & Sounding Stone (1981)—were created by Noguchi to be played as instruments. The string players should tune 1/6th tone flat to match the pitch of the stones, and in general all pitches should be tuned to the overtones of the stones. birth, death may be performed on other stone, metal, or glass objects with the fundamental of E and/or G for the first movement, and C-sharp for the second movement. The work is dedicated to Anne Grilk King.

Premiered February 5, 2017 at The Noguchi Museum, Long Island City, New York. Many thanks to The Noguchi Museum’s incredible staff for facilitating rehearsals and access to these unique sculptures.

Download the score.